Wednesday, October 3, 2007

Ep 11 a Carlo Mollino Design 02


Here's our second episode on the Carlo Mollino inspired coffee table. Our homage to the charismatic Italian Architect and Designer from Turin Italy.

We start with a snap of furniture history and begin to develope the atmosphere that Carlo was trained in and worked arounded.

Construction engineering is dealt with in this Mollino furniture design and a present day solution is found. Our bending form template is completed and we press our 2-ply, the answer to our construction issue.

This Carlo Mollino form just gets more exciting.

Enjoy........Neil

13 comments:

David said...

Neil -

Awesome episode! I really appreciate how you are always weaving in design and history with each of your episodes. You are without a doubt giving us a very rich palette to enjoy. I am looking forward to how the edges of the laminated piece will be handled.

I posted your comment on the FWW call for contemporary fruniture designs on Lumberjocks.com

Thanks!
David

Mark said...

Neil,

Good episode. Your knowledge of design and designers never ceases to amaze me! Looking forward to the next one to see things start to come together.

--Mark

Mark Mazzo said...

Neil,

Good episode. Your knowledge of design and designers never ceases to amaze me! Looking forward to the next one to see things start to come together.

--Mark

P.S. Sorry for the double post Blogger seems to always try to use my old blogger account.

Huckleberry said...

Neil,

When I first got into wood working I could've cared less about anyone's history in wood working. But now as I have matured (as a wood worker), I find myself talking a lot about Maloof. I just wanted to thank you for putting the history lessons in there for guys like me who are starting to learn about the true pro's in the profession. Also I really enjoy your knowledge of veneering, I have finally completed my first big project and I did my first veneer on the table top and, if I may say so it looks great. Can't wait for the wife to see it after all it is for her.

Thanks,
Huckleberry

Luke said...

Hey Neil,

Just wanted to let you know that I'm loving the show! The veneer work is very interesting, hope to do some work with veneer soon. I'll be re-watching all your videos whenever I get my project started.

Thanks for taking the time to share your ideas with us!! Really appreciate it.


--Luke

Glen said...

Neil,

Another excellent video!

I especially appreciated the shout-out at the end of the video. Unfortunately, I'm battling some bronchitis and you triggered a 5 minute coughing fit because I was laughing so hard! But I still appreciate the call-out. I love how you make your videos personable that way.

Sorry for not having posted recently -- been doing some traveling, putting in overtime, and picking up bronchitis. :-(

You showed such amazing cool when you cut through the paper layout of the form. That's an excellent example of keeping things in perspective and not compounding the first mistake with a second. I could take a lesson there.... But I must admit that taking my frustrations out on those stringers so they would fit in the trash was very gratifying too!

While I'm not as big of a fan of the modern design style, I'm enjoying learning about the veneering techniques that are going into this table top. It's easy to see how the method would carry over to other designs. I have recently picked up "curved door envy", so I'm watching your veneer techniques carefully.

I hadn't mentioned this earlier, but I really like the overhead camera that you're using on some of the shots. The perspective is great and helps show what's going on.

Keep up the great work!

Glen

jlchrls said...

Just found this video blog you have and I am so impressed. What a wonderful service you provide here. I have been woodworking for too many years to count (if I go back to the Lincoln Logs I got when I was 3, that's 57 years of experience)and have had experience almost all aspects of this wonderful craft. I am retired now and have started my own blog to spread the joy of working effectively with my hands. I find it refreshing to see such high quality still being offered to some willing students. I will shout your praise on my own blog.

Thanks
JimC

Ace HoleInOne said...

Interesting fellow Carlo was. Upon a little googling, you will begin to understand Carlo knew that life was about the journey. Furthermore, Carlo developed a deep appreciation for the unclothed female shape. From what I have read, this particular table is a representation of a silhouette of a reclining woman. Now, take a deep breath, tilt you head a smidgen… you'll begin to see it. Carlo you rascal you…

Ace

Pete said...

Neil,

I am a little confused on the need for the backer on the birds eye veneer. Is it do to the oreination of the grain of the veneer or is it just a concern of an imperfection in the bendable ply showing through, i.e. the thickness of the veneer?

Love the show.

Thanks, Pete

Tom said...

Neil,

Another fantastic video series. I'm on the edge of my seat waiting to see how you do the form. The history behind the design was excellent, but you've set a standard for your work that I've come to expect. I was just re-watching the veneering episodes as your work, and David's adventure on his blog at Lumberjocks has me gearing up for a retirement piece for my mother that will incorporate your methods.

Thanks,

Tom
Lumberjocks.com - Mot

neil said...

Pete:

The main reason is to prevent long term, the bending ply from showing any imperfections as you mention. But because this birds-eye is rotary cur, I fealt grain orientation was important here. I'll clear this up in next episode.

Neil

calchris said...

Neil,

Just came across your Carlo Mollino episodes. Great project!! I'm all fired up to follow along and build one myself.

Will we be done in time for Xmas?

Thanks,
Chris

daveintexas said...

I really enjoyed the lingerie chest series of videos and have also enjoyed the "Mollino" episodes.
I am anxiously awaiting for you to build the form.

Maybe in the future, you and darryl keil can do one together??
Maybe something on the complicated side, like veneering colums or such.

Thanks for sharing you idea's.

Dave

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